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Barnsley top of exclusion list

Wednesday October 5 2016


Both Barnsley and Middlesbrough also had the highest exclusion rates, with both having the equivalent of one exclusion for every six pupils last year Both Barnsley and Middlesbrough also had the highest exclusion rates, with both having the equivalent of one exclusion for every six pupils last year


BARNSLEY had the joint highest school exclusion rate in the country last year, with the town having the equivalent of one exclusion for every six pupils.

Figures released by the Department of Education also suggest that Barnsley has seen one of the largest increases in fixed term exclusions over the last three years, up a staggering 303 per cent.

The figures apply to state-funded primary, secondary and special schools. 







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Reply Posted by Anon on Wednesday October 5 2016 at 10:15
I wonder how many of them exclusions are for petty incidents I.e wrong uniform, wrong colour hair, hair too short etc.

Reply Posted by Anon2 on Friday October 7 2016 at 08:47
Anon, the main reasons, I just read are persistent disruptive behaviour, verbal abuse and physical assault of another pupil. A much smaller proportion of exclusions are for drugs/alcohol incidents, bullying and sexual assault.

Reply Posted by Anon2 on Wednesday October 5 2016 at 11:55
Most of the fixed term exclusions eg excluded for a day are no doubt for small incidents - incorrect uniform etc, not following the rules of the school that parents sign up for. That sort of exclusion, I think, is meant to get parents to take responsibility (as of course kids like having a day off, so it doesn't 'punish' the kids.) I feel sorry for the kids who want to come to school to learn and the parents who want to support their school.

Reply Posted by Anon3 on Wednesday October 5 2016 at 12:31
Despite everything, Barnsley schools had our best ever GCSE results this year with 55% students achieving A - C results at GCSE including English and Maths. In 2015 it was 50% Young people do need these results as a stepping stone, if at all possible. I feel sorry for the ones who didn't achieve these grades because their parents didn't support them, as well as those who didn't achieve because of total time wasters in their school and in their classes.

Reply Posted by Teacher from Barnsley on Wednesday October 5 2016 at 13:42
Unfortunately Academy Schools across the country, let alone across Yorkshire, have a very high proportion of exclusions of children with Special Educational Needs, especially children on the autistic spectrum. I don't have statistics to hand but I can google them and so can you, if interested. This is not a case of children not following rules about uniform etc, children on the autistic spectrum love rules, it is schools who can't cope with children with SEN as they take up time and staff and damage the performance in the GCSE tables.

Reply Posted by Robdought on Thursday October 6 2016 at 21:40
What is SEN short fall please.

Reply Posted by Annie on Sunday October 9 2016 at 11:44
Robdought - SEN shortfall could mean (when talking about the rise in exclusions) that since autumn 2014 there has been a change in legislation to do with SEN, Special Educational Needs. And this is gradually having an impact on the funding to schools for children with SEN. It could be there is a shortfall in funding for eg mentoring, support assistants etc. I know some schools are axing those jobs so hope this is helpful to you in your question.

Reply Posted by JS on Thursday October 6 2016 at 22:02
SEN stands for Special Educational Needs

Reply Posted by M on Sunday October 9 2016 at 13:48
agree with comments from teacher as until your child gets officially diagnosed the schools don't help and the child is classed as being disruptive and thus gets penalises for their conditions

Reply Posted by Teacher from Barnsley on Sunday October 9 2016 at 16:55
@M
I would also add, if parents truly think their children have a Special Educational Need, you must push & push as early as possible. I advise seeing your GP repeatedly as Autism is a medical condition and can only be diagnosed by a medical professional. GPs are often quicker to set the wheels in motion to access the right sort of help/diagnosis. Schools have very long waiting lists for Child Development Clinics and for older children CAMHS appointments.

Reply Posted by Mr s on Tuesday October 11 2016 at 12:02
Bet shafton out wood top the list for barnsley



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