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Travel Pass Row Erupts Over Housing Development

Wednesday August 15 2012



A DEVELOPER given planning permission for 60 houses in Bolton is trying to get a condition to provide those who move in with free travel passes revoked.

Gleeson Homes and Regeneration was given planning permission for a housing development on Lowfield Road in December - on the condition that it would give one year travel passes to the first occupier of each of the houses.

The aim of the passes was to encourage people to use public transport and reduce the number of cars going to and leaving the site.

The company was granted full planning permission in December but has now applied for the removal of the condition.

A supporting statement for Gleeson said: "Since planning permission was granted, the applicant has reviewed the scheme and considers the requirement for a travel pass to be provided to the first occupier of each dwelling is unnecessary owing to other sustainable transport measures proposed for the site.

"Gleeson's have also found that the condition is unreasonable given it affects the viability and deliverability of the scheme. The condition was imposed without prior discussion and agreement with the applicant."

Gleeson's have now asked for the condition to be removed.

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Reply Posted by john the builder on Wednesday August 15 2012 at 14:40
The construction industry is on its knees, so before we have people on moaning about 'rich developers riding roughshod over planning blah blah blah...' remember, these projects bring jobs, improve local amenities and housing facilities. They are privately financed. Massive contributions are made to the councils by the developer to cover connection to existing services, and keep local planners employed. Most developers are barely making a profit at the moment so for the council to ask for all the residents to get a free bus pass as well(at further massive expense to the developer) is only adding insult to injury. Remember, the developer can go do a project somewhere else instead......

Reply Posted by On looker on Wednesday August 15 2012 at 15:01
Just merely browsing thru this article, but I'd have to disagree with the comment "at further massive expense to the developer) is only adding insult to injury!"

If that planning/development was Agreed upon WITH That stipulation in the contract, he cant just change his mind AFTER his planning permission had been granted.
Thats a load of Bull - and therefore has gained the council's permission or whatever under false pretenses.

he said
"give me the land, and i'll pay for travel passes for the occupants"
council say
"yeh go on then, sounds good"

after permission granted
"nahh sorry, changed mi mind - cant be bothered to fulfill the proposed bonus gunna cost me too much"

Tough Luck sunshine.. promise is a promise.
tut !

Reply Posted by guesty mcguest on Thursday August 16 2012 at 11:16
totally agree, they made/agreed on the proposal and yes they could have gone somewhere else, fair dos do that then.

They agreed on the contract and cannot renege on it.

Reply Posted by Mick rushton on Friday August 17 2012 at 09:49
Totally agree with on looker, if you bought a property with a stipulation that they would build a swimming pool in 6 months, you'd still want the swimming pool! Its a case of get tenants/residents in then try and renaig on the deal! If they withheld their rent/mortgage there'd be hell on so why does it not work otherway round?

Reply Posted by AJ on Wednesday August 15 2012 at 17:31
If you look in article the developer states it was imposed without consultation so the developer has every right legally to ask if this condition to be removed. They haven't started building have they??
"Gleeson's have also found that the condition is unreasonable given it affects the viability and deliverability of the scheme. The condition was imposed without prior discussion and agreement with the applicant."

Reply Posted by John T.Builder on Wednesday August 15 2012 at 19:21
Firstly, its safe to say that the council did not 'give' him the land, he probably paid for it.
What if the owners dont want or need buspasses?
Why stop with builders, why not force all bolton shops to provide customers with a 'free' bus ticket with every purchase to aid 'sustainability' of the local bus service on top of the business rates council tax etc. Visit five shops, get five bus tickets.

Reply Posted by john t builder on Wednesday August 15 2012 at 19:26
The council can make these unaffordable/uneconomic to build by adding evermore onerous conditions to the planning permission. they just make them up.
How about: 'In the interests of sustainability of local amenities, and in line with good planning practice all purchasers of the development are to be given season tickets to Bolton Wanderers FC'

Reply Posted by john T builder on Wednesday August 15 2012 at 19:29
Once again, the the developer can take his investment elsewhere. Another community can benefit from a similar project.................

Reply Posted by njc on Thursday August 16 2012 at 08:59
The developers not doing it for the community they doing it to make money. Just put the price of the ticket on the property if its cutting into the profits that much.